Thoughts at the intersection of people and place, being and belonging in the desert Southwest.

Stand of Popular Trees

History, in Black and White

by Jen Jackson June 21, 2012 Desert Reflections

Coyote is a place. Cosme is a name. And the aspen trees only hint at the fact that they are also so much more.

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A Meditation on Taxidermy and the Breath that Binds

A Meditation on Taxidermy and the Breath that Binds

by Jen Jackson April 10, 2012 Desert Reflections

The walls had eyes. Literally. The cabin was a veritable monument to taxidermy.

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Desert Rat Dumpster Diving

Desert Rat Dumpster Diving

by Jen Jackson February 23, 2012 Desert Reflections

Then the real mystery appeared. Beyond the burned-out caboose stood Scraphenge.

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Forgetting is a Failure of Conscience

Forgetting is a Failure of Conscience

by Jen Jackson December 23, 2011 Desert Reflections

Utah holds a heartrending history with the atom.

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Questioning answers, strengthening humbleness and other gifts of the desert stream

Questioning answers, strengthening humbleness and other gifts of the desert stream

by Jen Jackson October 11, 2011 Desert Reflections

As we prepare to leave for our first-ever float of the Grand Canyon, I find myself reflecting on my relationship with rivers.

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Mountain Gazette - Desert Reflections

Jeweled Jars of Memory

by Jen Jackson September 12, 2011 Desert Reflections

We have entered our headlong rush through the season of breathtaking bounty.

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Aaron Andrew

The (Supposed) Madness and Mystery of the King of the World

by Jen Jackson August 3, 2011 Desert Reflections

The facts are few, barely enough to illuminate a life: He went by the name of Aaron Andrew.

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Welcome to the World's Playground

Welcome to the World’s Playground

by Jen Jackson June 22, 2011 Desert Reflections

They had the look of college kids on spring break. The sum total of their communication consisted of screaming “Yeah! MOAB!” utilizing various intonations and pronunciations.

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